Sociological Methods and Brexit

Theoretical approaches can help us better understand Brexit

Giving a voice to Generation Brexit

Giving a voice to generation Brexit

Young people were under-represented in the Brexit referendum because only 40 per cent turned out to vote, but those who did vote opted overwhelmingly to remain. So how can those most affected by the outcome of the exit negotiations be given a voice? A crowd sourcing initiative at London's LSE is attempting to do this.

Gurminder Bhambra: Everything you know about Brexit is wrong

Generation Brexit - Is populism a threat to democracy?

Podcast

LSE European Institute

Details

Generation Brexit

Details

Learning Outcomes

In this study guide, you will learn more about a range of methods that researchers use to investigate key sociological issues such as Brexit. You will discuss:

  • The differences between quantitative and qualitative methods of research.
  • The differences between primary and secondary sources of data.
  • The key elements of research design
  • How researchers have analysed the Brexit vote and the methods that they have used.

 

ALL CONTENT INCLUDED IN THIS STUDY GUIDE HAS BEEN COMPILED BY THE GENERATION BREXIT PROJECT TEAM UNDER THE DIRECTION OF DR JENNIFER JACKSON-PREECE, DEPUTY HEAD OF THE EUROPEAN INSTITUTE, LSE. 

Sociological Methods and Brexit

Activity One

Activity Two

Design your own research project on Brexit.

 In this task, you will design your own research proposal for any aspect of Brexit that interests you.

 You should decide the following:

  1. The title of your project
  2. 2-3 Questions that you are interested in
  3. The type of methods that you are using, and justify why they are the best to answer your questions
  4. How you will collect your data, and get access to your sample.
  5. If there are any ethical considerations to your proposed research.

Activity Three

Results of the Brexit referendum highlighted that a majority of young people voted in favour of remaining in the European Union. Generation Brexit gives young people across the UK and the EU a voice in the Brexit negotiations. 

Go to the page https://generationbrexit.org/category/19951 and look at how young people discuss whether the Brexit vote was fuelled by populism.  

Look at what young people are saying and think of how you’d go about answering that question sociologically using the data from Generation Brexit.

  • Is this quantitative or qualitative data? Or both?
  • Is this primary or secondary data?
  • Taking into account how researchers have analysed the Brexit vote and the methods that they have used, how would you begin study populism using the data from Generation Brexit?

Do you have an idea to share?

Generation Brexit has one purpose: it gives young people across the UK and the EU a voice in the Brexit negotiations. By taking part in this policy making project you can shape the future of UK-EU relations post-Brexit. The best ideas will be turned into policy proposals sent to the UK and EU parliaments. 

Generation Brexit is also offering an exciting opportunity for Sixth Form students to intern with an LSE crowdsourcing project as a PLATFORM FACILITATOR responsible for encouraging constructive engagement with Brexit related issues amongst platform users.

 Each PLATFORM FACILITATOR will be expected to spend half an hour on the platform each week for a period of four weeks, and earn 100 participation points on the platform. These participation points can be earned by voting or commenting on other people’s ideas, responding to surveys or posting your own ideas. PLATFORM FACILITATORS who fulfil these requirements will receive a certificate  from the LSE to highlight their contribution to the project.

 This is a great opportunity to participate in the Brexit debate and gain valuable experience that you can include in your UCAS personal statement. For more information contact brexit@lse.ac.uk

Sociology of Brexit 101

Sociology of Brexit 102

Sociology of Brexit 103

Sociology of Brexit 104

How the United Kingdom voted on Thursday… and why

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